UK's most powerful 'part-timers' unveiled

The 'Power Part Time Top 50' recognises the senior directors and entrepreneurs who manage to work business-critical jobs on a part-time basis.

by Rebecca Burn-Callander
Last Updated: 19 Aug 2013

The term 'part-timer' is more frequently used as an insult than a compliment. But Timewise Jobs, the specialist recruiter for part-time positions, aims to change all that. In the first ever awards aimed solely at part-time bosses, the Power Part Time Top 50 has scoured the length and breadth of the land to find the entrepreneurs and senior executives doing stellar work at their organisations, while working fewer than five days a week.

Timewise put together the Power Part Time list after a survey of 2,000 people by ICM found that nearly three in four Britons ‘don’t believe’ it’s possible to have a senior level career on a part time basis. This despite the fact that 650,000 people in the UK now work part-time jobs, earning more than £40,000 per annum. 'The calibre of people on the Power Part Time list kills the notion that you cannot work a senior level job on a part time basis,' says Karen Mattison, founder of Timewise Jobs. 'The world has moved on.'

The individuals ranked in the list come from a wide variety of industries and backgrounds, from SMEs to charities to leading high street brands. Accenture's Mike Dean manages 900 people despite working just 3.5 days a week. Dean went part time after collapsing at his desk as a result of a serious medical condition in 2009. He now runs two youth groups and assists with a youth football team in his spare time.

Artsdepot CEO Tracy Cooper works three days a week while running a bustling arts venue in North London which welcomes 100,000 visitors a year. Lea Paterson is the most senior female monetary policy official at the Bank of England and the first female head of the inflation report and bulletin division. She works part time to spend more time with her three children.

Other winners include: commissioning executive producer for the BBC Clare Paterson; CEO of social enterprise Belu Water, Karen Lynch; Harriet Lamb, boss of the Fairtrade Foundation; Dixons Retail CEO Katie Bickerstaffe; 'Retail Queen' Belinda Earl, style director for Marks & Spencer; and Helen Michels, global innovation director at Diageo.

MT's own features editor Emma De Vita was among the judges for the Power Part Time list, alongside Timewise Jobs' Mattison, Steve Varley, managing partner at Ernst & Young, and Lynn Rattigan, Ernst & Young's deputy chief operating officer. 'The calibre of the entrants was outstanding,' says De Vita. 'And the sooner part-time working loses its stigma in the UK, the better.'

To find out more about the quiet revolution of part-time workers, check out this MT feature.

Read the whole Power Part Time list here

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