Debate: Bonus culture - force for good or unnecessary evil?

With bonus rows still raging on both sides of the Atlantic, MT debates the pros and cons...

by
Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

At the Cass Business School on Thursday March 26, MT will chair a debate about one of the most controversial issues of the day: does the bonus culture that has become prevalent throughout UK plc act as a beneficial force, driving market participants to greater heights of achievement? Or is it a pernicious influence, encouraging dangerous and unnecessary risk-taking that could cripple the system? MT, along with Cass and editorial intelligence, has put together a panel of experts to discuss this thorny topic...

MT editor Matthew Gwyther will chair the breakfast debate; he’ll be joined by Tim Harford, the ‘Undercover Economist’, Sir Peter Viggers MP (whose role on the Treasury Select Committee has given him a front-row seat for some of the recent fireworks), Alan Leaman, the CEO of the Management Consultancies Association, Telegraph business commentator Tracy Corrigan and Spectator Business editor Martin Vander Weyer.

They’ll certainly have plenty to discuss. The row over bonuses paid to AIG executives in this US continues to rumble on, with President Obama weighing in against the sizeable awards this week. And on this side of the Atlantic, the bonuses and golden handshakes paid out to some of the banking bosses (whose ill-judged bets have brought the global economy to its knees) have caused public outrage. But while most people would agree that there should be no ‘rewards for failure’, to quote the oft-used mantra, are we in danger of throwing the baby out with the bathwater? Is there still an important role for bonuses in a fully-functioning financial system?

The debate kicks off at 8am on Thursday March 26 at the Cass Business School in London. If you fancy attending this invitation-only event, click here for more details.

Find this article useful?

Get more great articles like this in your inbox every lunchtime

Subscribe

Get your essential reading delivered. Subscribe to Management Today