Half-hour meeting with Apple's Tim Cook? $600,000, please

You read it right the first time. The bidding in a charity auction for which the top prize is an audience with Apple's CEO has passed $600,000. That's equivalent to about 1,000 iPhones.

by Michael Northcott
Last Updated: 30 Oct 2014

Finding our more about the inner workings of the mysterious giant that is Apple is a holy grail of the business world. But for one lunch break only, CEO Tim Cook is making himself available to the highest bidder for a chinwag.

The auction, which is being run on the Charitybuzz website will close at 9pm this evening, but there has been a surge of interest in the offer on this, the last day of the auction. It has so far attracted a top bid of $600,000, which equates to about $20,000 per minute. Or $333 per second.

As a measure of the esteem in which Apple’s boss is clearly held, it’s worth noting that a previous charity stunt like this attracted a final offer of $255,000 – and that was for an entire day with former US president Bill Clinton.

The bidding is now so high that bidders have to prove that their offer is a genuine one (and they can afford it) before they are allowed make it, and when the money is finally despatched, it will be donated to the Robert Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights.

Bidders so far have included firms that manufacture the bauble for Apple products (such as cases and covers) as well as technology start-ups. The found of mobile headset company DrBluetooth.com told the Guardian newspaper that he offered $580,000 for the opportunity.

He said: ‘It would give us a chance to showcase the whole concept of what we’re doing to him. I’m sure he would give us some frank opinions.’ As well as being the once-in-a-lifetime sales opportunity…

Other celebs that have been featured for a similar deal on Charitybuzz include U2’s Bono, former Beatle Paul McCartney, and there was even an auction for a part as an extra in Scary Movie 5.

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