JP Morgan retreats from the vicious Twittersphere

The bank's attempts at a Twitter Q&A have been dashed by angry tweeters.

by Gabriella Griffith
Last Updated: 20 Nov 2013

Hardly a week goes by we don’t watch as some relatively unpopular company takes to Twitter to ‘engage’ with its followers, only to receive a tsunami of abuse by the angry online mob. Last week it was Ryanair, the week before British Gas, now it’s American uber bank, JP Morgan.
 
To be fair to Ryanair, chief executive Michael O’Leary did a pretty good job of answering even the most rude of comments with humour and, where necessary, humility. The social media wizzes at JP Morgan however, have cancelled the Q&A before it’s even happened.

There's some irony in this PR gaffe too - JP Morgan acted as an underwriter for Twitter's recent $14bn IPO.


Yesterday, the bank announced it would hold the Q&A with Jimmy Lee, one of its VCs getting ready to answer the world’s questions.



Six hours, and a wave of abuse, later – the Q&A was cancelled.


 
Why the turnaround you might ask? Well, MT has gathered together a nice segment of the offending tweets to give you an idea…
 
(We wonder who will be running the corporate Twitter gauntlet next week?)
 
 

Ouch.
 
 
 


Find this article useful?

Get more great articles like this in your inbox every lunchtime

Upcoming Events

Latest on MT

Should CEOs resign after a personal scandal?

Should CEOs resign after a personal scandal?

Antonio Horta-Osorio says he won't quit Lloyds after The Sun labels him a 'love rat'.

Was Virgin Trains right to call out Jeremy Corbyn?

Was Virgin Trains right to call out Jeremy Corbyn?

Attacking politicians is seldom a good idea, no matter how far from power they seem.

Why working mothers are screwed

Why working mothers are screwed

Working mums are paying a 'motherhood penalty', missing out on pay rises and promotions.

How to stop your business getting too big for you

How to stop your business getting too big for you

Doubling your team overnight might sound like a start-up's dream, but it can very quickly turn into a nightmare if you're not careful, says digital marketing entrepreneur Guy Levine.

Aldi and Lidl's growth story is far from over

Aldi and Lidl's growth story is far from over

UPDATE: The discounters continue to expand market share, but there's a glimmer of hope for Tesco. Asda not so much.

Why your business should consider ditching bonuses

Why your business should consider ditching bonuses

Star fund manager Neil Woodford is getting rid of bonuses, claiming they can cause the wrong kind of behaviour.