KFC to create 9,000 jobs

Finger lickin' good news: KFC will generate UK jobs with a £150m expansion.

by
Last Updated: 06 Nov 2012

In yet another sign of success in the thriving fast-food sector, the American chicken chain plans to invest £150m in opening 200-300 new restaurants across the country in the next three to five years.

Sales at KFC were up 6% on the previous year in 2008, and results for 2009 are already showing a 14% increase. This follows similar tales of surging sales and expansion from the likes of Domino's pizza and Subway - chains that are cleaning up in the recession as people trade down to cheaper food and takeaways. Good news for the economy; perhaps not so good for the government's drive to curb obesity. Still, you can't win them all.

KFC boss Martin Shuker has pointed out that KFC's sales have risen in all but one of the past 15 years, and that it was also gaining market share at the expense of such rivals as McDonalds.

The chain was launched in the 1930s by Colonel Sanders, whose smug face peers out from high-streets across the UK like an Orwellian version of Captain Birdseye. It already employs 20,000 staff in its 760 UK outlets. Such jobs sit towards the bargain bucket end of the employment market - not only are many positions part-time and minimum wage, but the chain actually began taking on bouncers at some stores last year on Friday and Saturday nights to protect its staff.

Still, right now of course, any positive employment news is welcome. The restaurants will employ 25-40 people each, and will be located around the country, with particular emphasis on the north of England and south Wales, areas where jobs are welcome at the best of times. Now, how about some skilled positions?


In today's bulletin:
Weekend woes as BMW cuts 850 Mini staff
Lloyds hammered again amid nationalisation fears
KFC to create 9,000 jobs
NEDs getting more bread
The Sharp End: Postman dings twice

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