LAUNCHPAD: Flappy Bird flaps no more

The Flappy Bird creator has taken the addictive app down, saying 'I cannot take this anymore'.

by Rachel Savage
Last Updated: 20 Mar 2014

MT is in mourning – Flappy Bird has flapped its last. No more will gamers sit glued to their devices tapping furiously, only to throw said device across the room as the pixellated bird crashes into a pipe again.

The game’s Vietnamese creator Dong Nguyen took the free app off the iTunes App Store and Google Play yesterday afternoon after tweeting on Saturday, ‘I am sorry 'Flappy Bird' users, 22 hours from now, I will take 'Flappy Bird' down. I cannot take this anymore.’



The independent developer added that he wasn’t removing the deceptively difficult, old-fashioned arcade-style game for legal issues and tweeted, ‘I don’t sell ‘Flappy Bird’, please don’t ask.’

Nguyen has taken Flappy Bird down despite earning an average of $50,000 a day from in-app ads, after it topped the App and Google Play Store download charts for nearly a month. The game was downloaded over 50 million times – that’s a helluva lot of repetitively strained click fingers.

Nguyen even told The Verge he was thinking about creating a sequel just last Wednesday. No wonder the gaming world is scratching its head – the developer has thrown away the kind of success that most bedroom programmers can only dream of.

However, the game’s viral success unsurprisingly attracted internet haters. It had been reviewed over 47,000 times on the App Store – about the same number as Gmail has. Bloggers got suspicious that the total could’ve been artificially inflated and pointed out that many of the five star reviews were actually negative (‘this game has ruined my life,’ wailed one addict).

Nguyen also got a load of death and suicide threats on Twitter when he announced he was pulling the game, so his decision to escape the online furore probably backfired somewhat.

For all you Flappy Bird devotees suffering withdrawal symptoms, there might be a silver, pixellated lining:

Or you could just scour Ebay for an opportunist flogging an old phone with the game already loaded on.

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