MT Special: 'How to Do More with Less' Week

Our five-part video guide on how to achieve maximum results for minimum outlay starts today.

by Andrew Saunders
Last Updated: 15 Feb 2011

This week is 'How to Do More With Less' week on managementtoday.com – a subject which we're prepared to bet is pretty close to all our readers’ hearts just at the moment. Indeed, with the faltering recovery, yo-yo-ing consumer confidence and the prospect of higher taxes and reduced public spending ahead, we can’t think of a better time to be taking a close look at this particular topic.  The mysterious art of extracting maximum bang from minimum buck is likely to remain top of the agenda in both public and private sectors for the foreseeable future.

Of course it’s easy to say that we all need to do more with less, but very much harder to achieve in practice. The law of unintended consequences lies ever in wait to catch the unwary. So just how should you go about it? Is it about a mindset or a methodology? Does it call for a long-term shift in attitudes and expectations, or are there quick wins to be had even here?

To get the ball rolling, MT invited bosses from a diverse range of businesses - both large and small - to share their ideas, hints and tips on How to Do More With Less in a roundtable debate and a series of head-to-head interviews on the subject.

Today’s video features bosses and senior execs from the likes of Microsoft, Gazprom UK and Naim Audio answering the first and most fundamental of questions on the subject: exactly what does doing more with less mean in their businesses?

Their responses are many and varied, but they are all borne out of hard commercial experience, and we’re confident that you’ll find it valuable viewing. Come back tomorrow for part two, which looks at the tricky business of how to persuade your teams that doing more with less is good for them, as well as for you.

- See the introductory video at microsoft.managementtoday.com

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