Recession leaves bosses 'caught in a trap'

Some managers apparently feel 'trapped' in their careers. Perhaps they should be glad to have a job...

by
Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

According to a new report by Lifelong Learning UK, 57% of the 2,000 managers it surveyed are feeling trapped in their careers as a result of the credit crunch. We were under the impression that the uncertain economic climes had galvanised the workforce into upping their game, with the wheat duly sorted from the chaff and all ideas generally being bucked up, but the report suggests otherwise. Still, we can't help thinking there are currently 2.1m unemployed people out there who, we imagine, would kill for a job to feel trapped in right now...

Lifelong Learning goes on to suggest that this sense of restriction was even worse six months back, when 68% of managers reportedly felt trapped. The organisation explains the decline by suggesting people are now more confident in the job market - fewer people feeling trapped apparently shows they are now more bullish about other options. Or of course, it could just mean that they've decided to appreciate what they have, rather than moaning about it.

As an organisation that helps train people into management roles in further education, Lifelong Learning would no doubt prefer the former explanation, as it suggests people are still out there seeking alternatives. Indeed, the report also includes the finding that 22% of managers believe it is never too late to change career and are open to updating their skills. 

Of course, we're not against people wanting to improve themselves, or indeed organisations set up to help them do this. Especially at times like this. But we can't help being sceptical of the argument. According to the report, ‘making a difference is now more important than money'. We're sure it is for the noble few, and that's commendable - but in the middle of the worst financial crisis in living memory, putting food on the table is a more pressing concern for many out there. Even the report admits that 50% of those surveyed wouldn't take a lower paid job to make a difference - so it's presumably not more important for them...



In today's bulletin:

BP's profits tank but share price still spurts
Revenue to spend £1bn chasing tax-dodgers
Curry comperes Consultancy Awards
JJB gets sporting chance
Recession leaves bosses 'caught in a trap'

Find this article useful?

Get more great articles like this in your inbox every lunchtime

Subscribe

Get your essential reading delivered. Subscribe to Management Today