Salesforce-d? Now the City of London has waded in on the Great Heron Tower Name Debate

City of London councillor Tom Sleigh claims the skyscraper's renaming, which has so irked other tenants, doesn't actually have permission.

by Rachel Savage
Last Updated: 30 Jun 2014

Who knew a shiny new skyscraper could cause such a ruckus? The rechristening of the Heron Tower as Salesforce Tower has inflamed the ire of the building’s other inhabitants, who aren’t best pleased at having to put another company’s name on their stationery (even if Salesforce has offered to pay for new letterheads).

Now those tetchy tenants, who snubbed the tower’s renaming ceremony last week, have found themselves a political ally in the shape of Tom Sleigh. Sleigh, one of six City of London councillors for the Bishopsgate ward that contains the 46-storey building, claimed the tawdry renaming doesn’t even have the proper permission.

Sleigh has written to the City of London Corporation’s planning committee, calling for a public debate on Heron vs Salesforce. The latter, named for the cloud software firm that already has an eponymous tower in San Francisco and is also getting one in Paris, ‘makes a lot of people cringe’, Sleigh told City AM.

‘This is an iconic building in the City and there are relatively few examples of names being changed to company’s names,’ Sleigh said (although outside the City there are plenty of examples – The O2, BT Tower, etc etc).

Dan Wagner’s Powa Technologies, which occupies the 34th and 35th floor, also operates in sales technology and apparently wouldn’t have moved to the then Heron Tower had it known it would be renamed after a rival. While getting a skyscraper with your name on it is a pretty big honey pot for the City to dangle, the prospect of having your address altered without any warning could well send companies running for the West End.

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