Thinking behind our new look

Thinking behind our new look - Welcome to the new-look MT. We've spent the past nine months thinking hard about how we could improve the magazine, a process that has involved discussion, argument, consultation and, most importantly, talking to groups of readers about what they liked and what they were not so keen on. Much of what you had to say was gratifying, and during this redesign process we had some welcome news from the latest British Business Survey, which showed that more senior British business people are reading MT than ever before.

by Matthew Gwyther, MT editor
Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

Welcome to the new-look MT. We've spent the past nine months thinking hard about how we could improve the magazine, a process that has involved discussion, argument, consultation and, most importantly, talking to groups of readers about what they liked and what they were not so keen on. Much of what you had to say was gratifying, and during this redesign process we had some welcome news from the latest British Business Survey, which showed that more senior British business people are reading MT than ever before.

Our readership among chairmen/CEOs, MDs and deputy MDs has doubled since the previous research in 2000.

The last time the magazine was redesigned was in 1999, and we have won a clutch of awards since then. Some have expressed surprise that we wanted a refreshed look so soon. The truth is that you can never stand still.

We've been widely imitated and the whole mood in business has changed since the heady days of the late '90s. There are new needs to be met.

There's a growing sense that although MT still wants to be 'Not just business as usual', we also need to be a practical guide to business success.

So the ever-popular Brainfood has been expanded, we have a new business travel section at the back, a recharged Techno Life and a new Survey of Surveys each month in which we will distil numerous primary research sources to give you easily digested information about a different business topic each month.

We also have a new diarist, Howard Davies, who has recently stepped down as head of the FSA to take over the running of the London School of Economics.

He is a terrific read: witty, informative, right in there with the movers and shakers and newly freed from the shackles of public office to speak his mind.

There is, in short, even more of what you like in our pages each month.

And, in addition to the new regular slots, we'll also be writing more full-length features in the middle section of the magazine. We hope you enjoy what you see and what you read. Please tell us how you feel about our changes.

Our cover feature this month is an interview with woman of the moment Barbara Cassani, who is leading London's pitch to host the Olympics in 2012. We also have an exclusive extract from her book, Go: An Airline Adventure, about her time as head of the budget airline. She doesn't pull her punches on what happened there and her unhappiness about seeing her 'baby' sold out from under her wing. She has learned her lesson and tells MT: 'I will never again create a business for someone else to sell away. Ever.' You get the feeling she means it.

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