Why business is like... Calum Best

Calum Best may not have the legendary footie skills of his father George, but, off the pitch, there is no question that he is a champion in his own right when it comes to scoring.

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Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

From Rebecca Loos, Jodie Marsh and Sarah Harding to Abi Titmuss, Lindsay Lohan (pictured) and Rachel Hunter, Best's list of conquests reads like a directory of female celebrities.

Best may be famous for his success in the bedroom rather than the boardroom, but he has a surprising amount in common with the modern-day entrepreneur. They may have different targets in their sights but, that aside, there is surprisingly little to distinguish them.

Successful entrepreneurs get passionate about the businesses they build, but as Luke Johnson recently pointed out in the FT, they don't fall in love (just like Best). The recent abundance of capital has made it easier than ever for the seasoned entrepreneur to launch a new venture, and thanks to an army of private-equity houses searching for assets to acquire, their exit has been readily available. And so the cycle continues... What the pill did for free love, private equity and cheap debt have done for entrepreneurship.

But is this progress? Arguably, Best the Younger's modus operandi has not led to fulfilment. Given his notorious drug habit and short-lived interest in any one partner, it would be hard to conclude that he has found true happiness from his exploits.

In business, the same may be true of serial entrepreneurs. But if capital is drying up, threatening to interrupt the serial entrepreneurs' corporate philandering, longer-term relationships with the businesses they build may become inevitable. And that needn't make their lives any less fulfilling.

- Jenny Harris is director of JRBH Strategy & Management, www.jrbh.co.uk.

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