Do women wear low-cut tops to get ahead?

A study suggests women bare their cleavages to get ahead at work. We're a bit suspicious of that one...

by Emma Haslett
Last Updated: 02 Apr 2012
Down with roll-necks! Off with those oh-so-trendy pie crust collars! Away with shawls! For Friday was National Cleavage Day, apparently – and to celebrate, Wonderbra – the brand that taught us all the value of squeezing and pushing – has done a ‘study’, and found that one in seven women wear plunging necklines in the workplace, ‘to give their career a boost’. If you catch our drift…

The efficacy of that particular strategy in the career progression of the 1,000 or so women surveyed isn’t commented on in the ‘study’. MT can’t decide whether it would distract one’s colleagues from the matter at hand, thus rendering your team rather less effective that it otherwise could be. So in that respect, the one in seven don’t exactly come under the umbrella of ‘team players’. Then again, it could work as a low-cost motivational tactic.

Of course, this comes under the same category as ‘research’* we covered earlier this month, which ‘found’ that 72% of women had judged their female colleagues on inappropriate dress, but didn’t ask the chaps whether they do the same – ie. there are two sides to every coin. Firstly, there's no mention of the number of women who dress smartly 'in order to give there careers a boost' - and we wonder how many men jazz up their outfits – or even don a tighter-fitting trouser – in order to get noticed at work…

No word either on the percentage of men who wear plunging necklines in an attempt to boost their career prospects. But it could be one way to explain the prevalence of navel-grazing necklines seen in the garden of MT’s local pub as the weather has improved. And really, who wouldn’t want to promote a man who got his he-vage out for the benefit of his female colleagues? That’s being a team player…

* aka ‘someone’s opinion’

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