How to ask your boss about flexible working

Need a job less rigid than the 9 to 5? Here's how to convince your manager.

by Jack Torrance
Last Updated: 20 Aug 2020

Is being chained to your desk making it hard to get things done? Fortunately, since new legislation came into force in 2014, everybody has the right to request flexible working from their employer. But requesting and receiving are not one and the same, and employers can deny a request if they have a genuine business reason for doing so – such as a detrimental impact on quality or performance, or the burden of increased costs.

So what’s the best way to raise the subject with your boss? Take the solution as well as the problem with you, said Karen Mattison, co-founder and CEO of Timewise. Have a think about the business case yourself and how it could benefit the employer. ‘Put yourself in your boss's shoes,’ echoes Dena McCallum, founding partner in management consultancy Ed McCallum - and phrase it as a suggestion, not a demand. Watch the full video below.

Thinking about going part-time but worried you'll jeopardise your career? Karen Mattison will be chairing a panel on How To Make Part-Time Work at MT's Inspiring Women event on 16th November. Find out more here

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