Authentic values

Critics of Starbucks' expansion claim it has lost touch with its original values in which it aimed to create a 'third place' for people to relax outside of the home or the workplace.

by Fast Company, May 2007

Today it has thousands of stores replicating a formulaic model that is increasingly commercialised. Nike, some say, has managed to retain its authentic love of sport in spite of its growth; for instance, its sponsorship of a skateboarding team helped to maintain its integrity with the market of 15 million skateboarders.

Some connecting themes underpin authentic brands: they have a sense of place, which appeals to consumers even if that place is fictional, as in the case of New York's ice-cream enterprise, Haagen-Dazs; they need a strong point of view or a passion for what they do, which often comes from the founders; they should show that they serve a larger purpose that goes beyond profit-making and prove that they have integrity. This cannot be faked as McDonald/s found to its cost when it launched its ill-received 'We love to see you smile' campaign in 2000.

Who do you love? The appeal - and risks - of authenticity
Bill Breen
Fast Company, May 2007.

Sign in to continue

Sign in

Trouble signing in?

Reset password: Click here

Email: mtsupport@haymarket.com

Call: 020 8267 8121

Register

FREE

  • Up to 4 free articles a month
  • Free email bulletins

Register Now

Become a subscriber

From £66 a quarter

  • Full access to managementtoday.co.uk
  • Exclusive event discounts
  • Management Today's print magazine
  • Plus lots more, including our State of the Industry Report.

Choose a Package