Adam Gale

Editor

There’s little Adam likes more than a good conversation about business. It’s a good thing really, as MT's editor regularly chews the fat with CEOs, management gurus, academics and entrepreneurs. When he’s not chatting with Sir Martin Sorrell about his Latin O Level or musing about multitasking with Charles Handy, he’s more often than not found ‘deep diving’ into some data set or trying to figure out how to make his computer work. Occasionally covers tech, ironically.

Email: adam.gale@haymarket.com

Mike Ashley: Does it matter if the public hates you right now?

Mike Ashley: Does it matter if the public hates you right now?

The Sports Direct founder’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has drawn criticism, but in the scheme of things, will anyone remember?

COVID-19 is a chance for CEOs to show some humanity

COVID-19 is a chance for CEOs to show some humanity

Editorial: There's more to life than profit.

Empty offices make tempting targets for burglars

Empty offices make tempting targets for burglars

An unwelcome security risk of remote working.

Can mindfulness make you more creative?

Can mindfulness make you more creative?

Paying attention to your surroundings and listening intently can improve ideas.

The 9 worst things a leader can say

The 9 worst things a leader can say

Actions may speak louder than words, but words can still drop you in it.

Why you overvalue your own ideas

Why you overvalue your own ideas

And why you shouldn't.

An Orwellian nightmare for mice: Pest control in the digital age

An Orwellian nightmare for mice: Pest control in the digital age

Case study: Rentokil’s smart mouse traps use real-time surveillance, transforming the company’s service offer.

When doing the right thing gets you in trouble

When doing the right thing gets you in trouble

Concern with appearances can distort behaviour, as this research shows.

How to win at office politics

How to win at office politics

From feuds and power-hoarding to credit-stealing and cliques, workplace power plays can undermine an otherwise successful business.

Proof that CEOs don’t understand their own organisational culture

Proof that CEOs don’t understand their own organisational culture

This study measures the divergence between the values you profess and the values you see around you.