Stephen Jones

Stephen is Management Today's reporter, social media editor and unofficial books columnist. Away from the world of business you'll usually find him in a museum or booting balls around a sodden patch of grass. 

 

Follow him on Twitter at @SPJonesJourno

Managers overestimate how engaged their staff are

Managers overestimate how engaged their staff are

There is a perception gap between employees and managers, according to a CMI study.

Can bullying ever be unintentional?

Can bullying ever be unintentional?

Even the calmest of heads isn’t immune to the odd sharp word.

How the CEO got deluded

How the CEO got deluded

Just because you say your company is something, it does not mean it is.

Of course job flexibility attracts female applicants

Of course job flexibility attracts female applicants

A government-backed field study looked at the impact of wording on job applications.

“If you were a bad manager before the pandemic, you’re probably still one now”

“If you were a bad manager before the pandemic, you’re probably still one now”

Business psychologist Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic on what hybrid working does for performance management.

Why founder CEOs don't listen

Why founder CEOs don't listen

New research suggests that founders are more likely to ignore their management teams than other leaders.

How to stretch people without pushing them too far

How to stretch people without pushing them too far

The leaders that made me: Good bosses never just give you the answers, says Andrew Barraclough, GSK’s VP Design.

How leaders should talk about mental health

How leaders should talk about mental health

Employers trying to 'fix' the problem can make it worse, says mental health first aider Ian Hurst.

Why Sainsbury's is making job cuts

Why Sainsbury's is making job cuts

Don’t fall into the trap of believing that the supermarkets are all doing really well in the pandemic.

How to encourage people to speak out

How to encourage people to speak out

The leaders that made me: Vivek Chaudhri used to hold back from sharing his ideas, until a manager introduced him to the concept of psychological safety.