BRAIN FOOD: Global business - Socially acceptable entrepreneurs

BRAIN FOOD: Global business - Socially acceptable entrepreneurs - 'Entrepreneurship is no longer a dirty word in Germany. A representative survey, in which respondents picked the qualities they associated with business leaders from a list of positive and

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Last Updated: 09 Oct 2013

'Entrepreneurship is no longer a dirty word in Germany. A representative survey, in which respondents picked the qualities they associated with business leaders from a list of positive and negative characteristics, shows that their reputation has improved markedly since 1995. The sum of negative adjectives chosen, such as 'exploitative' and 'inconsiderate', has fallen by 22%, and no longer outweighs the total positive score. But the most striking result is the reputation young high-tech bosses enjoy: they are three times more popular than entrepreneurs in general, marking a 'paradigm shift' in people's perceptions. Traditional businessmen may be the class enemy, but the new start-up kings are 'deemed partners in the construction of a high-tech economy'. Of those aged 16 to 29, 58% 'definitely' or 'possibly' intend to start their own business - a 'sea change' in a country where historically young people have preferred a career in the public sector.'

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