BRAIN FOOD: Matters for the mind to chew on - Lord Chadlington - If I had to start again ... I just have!

BRAIN FOOD: Matters for the mind to chew on - Lord Chadlington - If I had to start again ... I just have! - At 58 years old, I am back as CEO of a small business with just 100 employees, and I have been trying to put the lessons of the past 35 years to go

by
Last Updated: 09 Oct 2013

At 58 years old, I am back as CEO of a small business with just 100 employees, and I have been trying to put the lessons of the past 35 years to good use.

First, respect the numbers. Even if you are not an accountant, you must understand a P and L account and the rudiments of a balance sheet. Study these regularly. You may not like what they tell you but they do not lie. Respect them.

Second, nobody matters more than your customer. Shareholders and employees are vital, but without customers you do not have a business You may not like what they tell you but they are always right. Respect them, too.

Third, respect the young. Give them real opportunity, real challenge and responsibility. They will always pay you back handsomely. Young managers drive a business forward; they are unconventional, hardworking and have no baggage. You may not like how they do it but they are your future.

Fourth, always search out bad news. Good news has a way of finding you; bad news hides away or it comes at the end of a meeting as an afterthought. Respect those who bring bad news - if you get it early you can act quickly.

Finally, never give up. When you are determined, you will find ways to succeed. Respect hard work against the odds.

Lord Chadlington was the founder of Shandwick and is CEO of marketing communications consultancy Huntsworth.

Tags:
How To

Find this article useful?

Get more great articles like this in your inbox every lunchtime

What pushy fish can teach you about influence at work

Research into marine power struggles casts light on the role of influence and dominant bosses...

The traits that will see you through Act II of the COVID crisis ...

Executive briefing: Sally Bailey, NED and former CEO of White Stuff.

What's the most useful word in a leader’s vocabulary?

It's not ‘why’, says Razor CEO Jamie Hinton.

Lessons in brand strategy: Virgin Radio and The O2

For brands to move with the times, they need to know what makes them timeless,...

Why collaborations fail

Collaboration needn’t be a dirty word.

How redundancies affect culture

There are ways of preventing 'survivor syndrome' derailing your recovery.