Brain food: Matters for the mind to chew on - Unlikely managers Coastal resources coordinator - Coastal Resource Project, Bohol, Philippines

Brain food: Matters for the mind to chew on - Unlikely managers Coastal resources coordinator - Coastal Resource Project, Bohol, Philippines - Name: Stuart Green

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Last Updated: 09 Oct 2013

Name: Stuart Green

When did you become a manager? When UK Voluntary Service Overseas gave me responsibility to manage the 'coastal-related technical programmes' - fish-sanctuary establishment, coral reef and mangrove resource assessments and training teams.

What does management mean to you? It's about keeping everyone happy and ensuring their activities are focused on the goals for the overall project. We work with communities and government to try to encourage actions that often go against traditional practices. It can be helping to establish fish sanctuaries or preventing people from fishing with dynamite, which destroys the coral reefs. But, whatever it is, it has to be an empowering process for the local community.

What do you love/hate about it? I love seeing a community change over time and seeing fishers who had used dynamite for 20 years helping to establish sanctuaries for future stocks. I hate seeing the coastal damage of unthinking development and fishing practices.

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