Letters from Malawi: Why are we thinking of cutting aid?

Will explains why rather than slashing the aid money we give to Malawi, we need to change how it's spent.

by
Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

I was reading one of the national newspapers over here last week and an article that quoted a recent piece in The Express caught my eye.  It was notable not only for the fact that opinions from The Express is rarely read outside Liverpool – let alone in sub-Saharan Africa – but it also reflected a seemingly growing wave of popular opinion in the UK.

Headlined ‘The Great Aid Rip-Off’, the article claimed that the UK taxpayer was funding the lavish lifestyles of Malawi’s leaders. The article was absurd and completely misrepresented the Malawian government, dubbing the (albeit imperfect – but name one that is perfect) democracy a ‘regime’ and, without any foundation, calling the democratically elected (and very economically able) president ‘one of Africa’s most notorious leaders’. Er – can you name him? [CONTINUES]

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Letters from Malawi: Why are we thinking of cutting aid?

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