MT Special: 'Know your Customer' Week, Part Four

In the fourth instalment of our Know your Customer, Grow your Business videos, our panel looks at taking customer insight into the boardroom.

by Andrew Saunders
Last Updated: 09 Oct 2013
Everyone realises, at least in theory, that customers are the key to the long-term health of any business – even the bog cheeses in the boardroom. They might like to think that it’s all due to their ace management skills and commercial instincts, but deep down they know that customers are the real decision makers..

But there’s a gap between theory and practice, caused by the challenge of bringing real customer insights into the boardroom in an engaging way. Too often customer conversations around the big table turn into stats-fests and death by spreadsheet.

How to bridge the gap? That’s the question our experts address today. For without boardroom engagement, customer insight has little chance of becoming the strategic differentiator it should be.


For archived videos from this and other series, please visit microsoft.managementtoday.com

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