What you can do to reduce employee fear and anxiety around COVID-19

Leaders need to help their workforce to emotionally self-regulate, says Dr Alan Watkins.

by Alan Watkins
Last Updated: 21 Apr 2020
Also in:
Coronavirus

As a medical doctor, with a degree in psychology and a PhD in immunology, I know that working from home isn’t enough, and that helping staff manage their fear and anxiety will be essential as we move through the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Most organisations have recognised their legal and moral responsibility towards their employees. Most have directed employees towards practical advice – hopefully from reputable sources, such as those provided by the NHS and WHO. 

The focus has been on physical measures- things like hand washing, social distancing and making plans to work from home where possible. But given the profound interaction between a human being’s psychology and immunology such guidance is not enough. In fact, organisations should do much more if they care seriously for their employees. 

Fear damages immunity

The thing that impairs human immunity more than anything else is the stress hormone cortisol. The level of fear and anxiety we experience has a direct impact on the level of cortisol we have flowing around our body. The more we panic the worse our immune system becomes.

Remember emotions matter

So responsible organisations need not only to offer practical guidance, they also need to offer emotional guidance too. They have a responsibility not to fuel the panic and anxiety. In fact, reducing fear and anxiety for employees must be a top priority for all organisations. 

Employees are being bombarded by scary stories on mainstream and social media. Their anxieties are being fed by this stream of news, rumour and speculation. While there is little control organisations can exert over the news reaching their employees from outside, they should take care not to amplify employee fears in their own internal communications. 

Social distancing and mental health

The right information helps reduce anxieties, and good internal communication is a start when it comes to addressing this emotional aspect of the current pandemic.

It’s worth remembering however that some of the practical advice might even directly increase fears and anxieties. Where they are able, many employees are being encouraged to work from home. They might also be asked to self-isolate if they have been in contact with someone who has COVID-19. 

While absolutely necessary from a physical health perspective this social distancing is likely to affect our mental health too. It can create feelings of isolation which can increase anxiety levels. Without those social support networks in your office, you may feel less able to deal with the anxieties you face. 

All of this means that the best advice for organisations right now to help them reduce the fear and anxieties of their employees is for them to help their workforce to emotionally self-regulate. In other words, to help them move away from a state of fear and anxiety towards a state of resolve.

Effectively embrace the classically British mantra “keep calm and carry on”. Panic will not help you. It will reduce your immunity and make you more likely to make the wrong choices for your situation.  

Don’t just think positive - FEEL positive

Effective emotional regulation starts with stabilising your breathing - breathing rhythmically and evenly through the heart area. Not deep breathing and not abdominal breathing. Such a breathing pattern stabilises your biology. Then try and deliberately experience a state of optimism or resolve or patience. Really try and feel this emotion in your body rather than just thinking it. Positive thinking won’t cut it. Positive feeling will increase the levels of the vitality hormone DHEA in your system. DHEA is the body’s main antidote to cortisol. 

Enabling employees to become masters of their own emotional state is critical to reducing fear and anxiety. It’s clearly very relevant to the current pandemic crisis and it’s my strongest piece of advice for organisations right now, but it’s something that will soon be seen as central to any effective employee wellbeing programme once this present crisis has passed.

Dr Alan Watkins is the CEO and co-founder of Complete and co-author of HR (R)Evolution: Change The Workplace, Change The World

Image credit: BSIP / Contributor via Getty Images

Tags:

Find this article useful?

Get more great articles like this in your inbox every lunchtime

How to host a virtual work Xmas party

It’s beginning to look at a lot like a video call Christmas.

Should you bin your frequent flyer card?

Management Today asks leaders if business trip culture is gone for good.

3 reasons your team isn’t innovating

Your ‘big idea’ cupboard is empty. Here’s how to fix it.

5 questions left unanswered by Sunak's spending review

Business leaders still need answers from the chancellor.

The CEO’s bookshelf: Maya Angelou, Mary Portas and Russell Brand

Neuro-Insight CEO Shazia Ginai shares her book and podcast recommendations for leaders.

Dominic Cummings & the importance of belonging

The PM's departed special adviser presents certain business lessons, whether he intended to or not,...