Slogan Doctor

Pedigree: It's a dog thing. For a long time, Pedigree Chum was the dog-food that top breeders recommended...

by John Morrish
Last Updated: 09 Oct 2013

For a long time, Pedigree Chum was the dog-food that top breeders recommended - or so its slogan said. But breeding and showing are not what dogs mean to most owners. Pedigree's current global campaign (it has ditched the Chum) belatedly embraces lovable mutts, prancing around, rolling in the mud and generally being adorable. Shot by TBWA in Los Angeles, it has been revoiced for Britain by cuddly Bill Paterson and equipped with a new slogan. 'Dogs rule' has become 'It's a dog thing'. This is no more than an attempt to make those meaty chunks dog-centric rather than owner-centric. But the slogan has a history. It began in the late 1980s on T-shirts. 'It's a Black Thing,' they said. 'You wouldn't understand.' It was anything but lovable. Times have moved on, and the line's racial prickliness has been softened by borrowing: 'It's a Girl Thing', 'It's a Guy Thing', even 'It's a Canadian Thing'. Indeed, 'Hey, it's a Dog Thing' has been used already by a smaller US dog-food supplier. 'Dogs rule' might have been a more culturally sensitive choice.

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