Are your staff really ill? Record tech investment & easyJet's holiday revamp

The UK's sick day subterfuge and other stories you might have missed this week.

Last Updated: 22 Nov 2019

easyJet relaunches package holidays

EasyJet intends to fill the void left by the collapse of Thomas Cook by relaunching its package holiday business. 

Chief executive Johan Lundgren is hoping easyJet Holidays will capitalise on a UK market worth an estimated £13bn. Currently the airline sells around 500,000 accommodation packages a year.

The plans were announced in easyJet’s 2019 financial results, which saw a 26 per cent fall in pre-tax profits in the 12 months ending 30 September. 

Lundgren also announced plans to offset carbon in a bid to become the world’s first major net-zero-carbon airline - a scheme that could cost £25m. 

(Source: BBC & CityAM)

Record investment in UK tech 

Nearly £9bn was invested in UK tech this year, a record according to data collected by Atomico. 

Increased investment in firms like Monzo, Deliveroo and OakNorth has helped Britain retain its place at the top of the European tech league table with £8.6bn ($11.1bn) being invested so far in 2019. Germany received $5.8bn while France received $4.8bn. 

While the amount invested has doubled since the 2016 Brexit vote, the total number of deals has declined. 

(Source: The Telegraph)

Are your staff really ill or do they just hate you?

ONS statistics indicate that the average UK worker takes four sick days a year. A new study suggests that two in every five admit that they would fake a sick day if they felt like they needed a break from work. 

Furthermore, 66 per cent would not tell their boss if they knew their colleague was absent but not ill, according to a study by ComRes, which asked 3,655 UK adults. 

While of course this represents a small and randomised proportion of the UK workforce, it presents nourishing food for thought for bosses and highlights the importance of ensuring staff feel appreciated. 

If the relationship is bad, employees are more likely to be untruthful. After all, as is often said, people don’t leave the company, they leave their boss. 

(Source: BBC)

Image credit: JOEL SAGET / Contributor via Getty

Tags:

Find this article useful?

Get more great articles like this in your inbox every lunchtime

Can you force staff to get vaccinated against Covid-19?

As world leaders grapple with a new “highly contagious” coronavirus mutation, mandatory vaccinations are being...

Howard Davies: Why pandemic travel is like a bad game from Scouts

NatWest Group's chairman had an eventful time travelling around Europe. Here, he unveils the winners...

Has remote working killed company culture?

MT Asks: Leaders give their verdict on WFH, “nothing can really replace human connection."

Why a robotics CEO says business should still be about people

Brian Palmer, boss of robotics company Tharsus, sees a future where robots don’t steal people’s...

Five growth lessons from bees

While every businessman may not be a beekeeper, the lessons that can be learnt from...

Why every company needs a Chief Sustainability Officer

Every C-Suite needs to make room for this increasingly important role, argues Sam Kimmins, head...