UK: BRITAIN'S MOST ADMIRED COMPANIES - THE LARGEST GAINS AND THE LARGEST LOSSES.

UK: BRITAIN'S MOST ADMIRED COMPANIES - THE LARGEST GAINS AND THE LARGEST LOSSES. - Aegis's honour as the table's highest climber owes more to earlier woes - a near collapse in 1992 - than current virtue. The same is true of Asda, which, previously laid l

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Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

Aegis's honour as the table's highest climber owes more to earlier woes - a near collapse in 1992 - than current virtue. The same is true of Asda, which, previously laid low by massive debt, has now recovered under Archie Norman's administration. More laudable, perhaps, is the achievement of Croda, which makes its debut in the table's upper ranks on the back of record profits. Queens Moats' travails are well-documented. Less spectacular is the fall of Blenheim. Dismal results, profits warnings and internal feuds have all served to remove its former shine.

THE LARGEST GAINS

1994 1992 Point change

189 240 Aegis 3.50

198 239 Asda 1.92

43 191 Glynwed International 1.71

73 212 Croda International 1.66

25 161 Whitbread 1.59

54 189 British Steel 1.55

66 201 Caledonia Investments 1.54

60 188 MAI 1.44

200 235 Royal Insurance Holdings 1.26

90 194 Kleinwort Benson 1.20

THE LARGEST LOSSES

1994 1992 Point change

260 166 Queens Moat Houses -2.51

256 80 Blenheim Group -2.18

108 11 Wellcome -1.47

235 104 Claremont Garments -1.35

82 10 Redland -1.34

222 79 Enterprise Oil -1.31

251 148 Yorkshire Tyne Tees -1.24

132 17 Yorkshire Electricity -1.22

138 18 Reckitt & Colman -1.19

212 84 Dawson International -1.13.

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