UK: CREATING THE WILL TO WORK - CREE AND BLAKE'S CORPORATE SERVICE.

UK: CREATING THE WILL TO WORK - CREE AND BLAKE'S CORPORATE SERVICE. - Most employers claim to have their staff's long term interests at heart - few, however, can be quite as far-sighted as those that retain the services of Cree & Blake, a Surrey-base

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Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

Most employers claim to have their staff's long term interests at heart - few, however, can be quite as far-sighted as those that retain the services of Cree & Blake, a Surrey-based firm of solicitors.

The firm, mindful of the fact that an average two-thirds of adults have not made a will (and that an inconvenient third die intestate), sought to lower the statistic by addressing the reasons why people typically failed to do so. These, it found, often came down to just two - the impracticality of taking time off from work and the perceived expense of legal expertise.

Its solution was simple - develop a quick, cheap and convenient process of making a will and take it into the workplace. Now, solicitors from the corporate division of Cree & Blake visit companies during working hours (current clients include Fyffes and Kodak) and conduct private will-writing sessions using specially adapted software. The entire process, it claims, can take under an hour - from first setting up the desktop computer to printing out the finished document - and, witnesses permitting, the will can take effect immediately.

There are also benefits in mass supply: 'Because we're handling a series of wills we can keep the cost down to less than £40 per head,' claims the firm's George Young. Some companies have reduced the price to staff further by subsidising the service. But does it count as a perk? And, if so, for whom - the staff or their heirs?

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