UK: Another dead cert for Hodgson? - HOWARD HODGSON'S PRONTAC SUCCEEDS.

UK: Another dead cert for Hodgson? - HOWARD HODGSON'S PRONTAC SUCCEEDS. - How does one describe a man whose first book - a record of his career as an undertaker - was entitled How To Become Dead Rich? "Enviable" might do, if the man in question is Howard

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Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

How does one describe a man whose first book - a record of his career as an undertaker - was entitled How To Become Dead Rich? "Enviable" might do, if the man in question is Howard Hodgson, who sold out his undertaking business in January 1991 for £5.8 million. Having cornered the British corpse market - Hodgson's competition, unlike his clientele, can scarcely be described as having been stiff - the ex-thanatopractitioner is now making inroads among the living with a firm called Prontac, a franchised accounting service for small businesses. After six months, Prontac has already turned over £500,000, and Hodgson projects a £2 million turnover by year two; there are also suggestions of a flotation within 18 months. Hodgson's success has been well deserved. Any man willing to admit to having been both an undertaker and an accountant in one lifetime deserves all our admiration. Perhaps dentistry next?

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