UK: A fertile thought from British Land.

UK: A fertile thought from British Land. - British Land's interim report, recently mailed to shareholders, has a cover picture showing what appears to be a bare concrete wall. But look again. As Sir David Attenborough used to say, "Even here, in this des

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Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

British Land's interim report, recently mailed to shareholders, has a cover picture showing what appears to be a bare concrete wall. But look again. As Sir David Attenborough used to say, "Even here, in this desolate place, there is life." In the bottom left-hand corner of the picture is a coy little pink flower. This is Armeria maritima - thrift, to you. A note inside explains: "The plant's ability to survive and prosper despite the harsh conditions of its natural habitat perfectly symbolises the position of The British Land Company in today's marketplace" - in other words, profits were up at halfway. But what a splendid idea. Other businesses should award themselves floral tributes equally rich in symbolism: Leontopodium alpinum might suit GEC (the edelweiss is only found high up a mountain); narcissus for ICI perhaps (it propagates by dividing); Pinguicula or butterwort (it gobbles up insects) for Hanson. Further suggestions welcome.

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