UK: Flying right in the face of badness - CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY.

UK: Flying right in the face of badness - CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY. - Perhaps some of Britain's more unscrupulous companies should be sent back to school - Manchester Business School, to be exact. There they will find Brian Harvey, Britain's first profes

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Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

Perhaps some of Britain's more unscrupulous companies should be sent back to school - Manchester Business School, to be exact. There they will find Brian Harvey, Britain's first professor of corporate responsibility. "Issues of social responsibility and ethics have come on to the management agenda in response to the practical needs of business," explains Harvey. "They are increasingly seen as disciplines for effective management in much the same way that marketing and finance are." The chair is sponsored by the Co-operative Bank, which operates an ethical policy stating who it will and will not do business with. London Business School has also announced an agreement with Dixons for a similar post.

Why this sudden outbreak of goodness? For those who prefer behaving badly, we propose another course. How about a fellowship in dirty tricks - sponsored by the world's favourite airline?

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