UK: Too many good intentions can be lethal - BRITISH TRUST.

UK: Too many good intentions can be lethal - BRITISH TRUST. - Whatever could have happened to the British Trust, that stirringly-named but curiously low-profile pressure group? Indeed, it is now so low-profile that it can no longer be found in the phone

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Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

Whatever could have happened to the British Trust, that stirringly-named but curiously low-profile pressure group? Indeed, it is now so low-profile that it can no longer be found in the phone book. At its launch in 1991 the Trust confidently declared its aim to improve Britain's quality of life and halt the perceived decline in public services. To prove the seriousness of its mission it paraded an impressive collection of corporate patrons. Step forward, among others, Sir Graham Day, Sir John Egan, Bernard Matthews and Gerald Ratner - as yet unknighted. Since then it has ground to a conspicuous halt. What, we ask, went wrong? "We were rather overtaken by events," explains founder Neil Jamieson. "The Citizen's Charter came along and took away our impetus. There's no point in the two of us doing it." Ah, so that's what. John Major has clearly got a lot to answer for.

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