USA: Accountants in double-entry cover-up.

USA: Accountants in double-entry cover-up. - Accountants are not universally popular, especially during a recession. To boost their image two Seattle professors, William Weiss and David Tinius, are promoting the cause of an Italian monk, Fra' Luca Paciol

by
Last Updated: 31 Aug 2010

Accountants are not universally popular, especially during a recession. To boost their image two Seattle professors, William Weiss and David Tinius, are promoting the cause of an Italian monk, Fra' Luca Pacioli, who, 500 years ago, wrote a slender volume containing a tract on double-entry book-keeping. The professors, who would like him acknowledged as the founding father of accountancy, have produced a short video with themselves as stars and are hoping to hold a fete at Luca's Tuscan birthplace on next year's anniversary of the publication. Yet no one seems to have pointed out that accountants already have a patron saint - Saint Matthew a tax-collector himself. He suffered the traditional contumely Jews afforded such people and now extends his patronage beyond accountants to tax collectors, customs officers, and security guards. It seems the professors should take another look at the books.

Find this article useful?

Get more great articles like this in your inbox every lunchtime

Social responsibility may no longer be a choice

Editorial: Having securitised businesses’ loans and paid their wage bills, it’s not inconceivable the government...

What went wrong at Wirecard

And how to stop it happening to you.

Leadership lessons from Jürgen Klopp

The Liverpool manager exemplifies ‘the long win’, based not on results but on clarity of...

How to get a grip on stress

Once a zebra escapes the lion's jaws, it goes back to grazing peacefully. There's a...

A leadership thought: Treat your colleagues like customers

One minute briefing: Create a platform where others can see their success, says AVEVA CEO...

The ignominious death of Gordon Gekko

Profit at all costs is a defunct philosophy, and purpose a corporate superpower, argues this...